Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of 2011, was announced on the 3rd of November. The final shortlist of six books seems like a formidable set of very compelling ideas and narratives.

Poor Economics by the founders of MIT’s Poverty Action Laboratory offers an alternative route for aid to the world’s poor. Their research suggests that lack of understanding of the needs of the poor leads to ineffective aid.

Exorbitant Privilege traces the rise of the US dollar, as the global currency, to America’s economic dominance. However, with China, India and Brazil challenging that position, the book warns both sceptics and supporters of the dollar.

Triumph of the City makes a compelling case for cities being the best places to live for mankind.

Willful Blindness makes the case that even as we have more access to information, we are guilty of deliberate acts of willful blindness. The truth is sometimes so terrifying that it could drive us to willful acts of self destruction.

Good Strategy, Bad Strategy explains the logic behind good strategic thinking and warns of the pitfalls of bad strategy that one must avoid.

The Quest helps understand global energy that is pivotal to geopolitical and economic dynamics and also central to climate change.